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whats the difference between pot and weed

Hash vs. Weed

Both hashish and marijuana — also called weed, pot or ganja — are parts of the cannabis sativa plant. The major difference between the two is that the term “weed” usually applies to dried pieces of the plant, mainly flower buds, while hash is a paste from resin, or sap of the plant. Hash contains a higher concentration of psychoactive chemicals.

Comparison chart

Hashish versus Marijuana comparison chart

Hashish Marijuana
Introduction Hashish, often known as “hash”, is a cannabis product composed of compressed or purified preparations of stalked resin glands called trichomes. The dried and cured flowers of a female is a preparation of the cannabis plant intended for use as a psychoactive drug and as medicine.
Legality in the U.S. Illegal under U.S. federal law Schedule 1 drug under U.S. Federal Law. Medical cannabis is legal in 29 states including the territories of Guam and Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. 8 states have legalized recreational use. (As of November 6th, 2017)
Derivation of Cannabis plant Cannabis plant
Ingestion Smoking, eating, vaporizing Insufflation: Combustion through pipes, bongs, wraps, cigarettes etc. Vaporization through vape pens. Edibles, creams, and transdermal patches are used.
Active ingredient Tetrahydrocannabinol Tetrahydrocannabinol
Form Semi-solid or paste Dried and cured flower, hashish
Name origin Arabic America Latin American

Contents: Hash vs Weed

  • 1 Origin
  • 2 Cultivation
  • 3 Legal status
  • 4 Availability
  • 5 Benefits
  • 6 Strength
  • 7 Side effects
  • 8 Other Negative Associations
  • 9 Recent News
  • 10 References

Origin

For centuries, the cannabis plant has been used in the Americas for its psychoactive and perceived health benefits. Most recently, weed, also called marijuana or pot, has been a popular recreational drug in North America.

Cannabis was also used in other parts of the world. Users in Africa and the Middle East preferred ingesting the resin of the plant, which contains a highly concentrated dose of the psychoactive substance THC. In Arabic, hashish means “grass.”

Despite strict prohibitions on drugs of any kind, hash is widely available across Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Middle East.

Cultivation

In general, marijuana is a type of grass plant that grows quickly – a reason for its nickname “weed” – in tropical or subtropical climates. Buds, stems, and flowers from a mature plant are typically dried and turned into smoking weed, or pot.

To get hash from a marijuana plant, cultivators separate glandular hairs called trichomes and compress them into a dense block using heat. Looked at under a microscope, trichomes appear as clear, viscous tentacles. The resulting product resembles a sort-of marijuana sap.

Legal status

Broadly, marijuana products are illegal across the world with a few notable exceptions.

Marijuana is illegal but tolerated and openly used in Pakistan; it is also legal in the Netherlands and Uruguay. Spain and Iran allow for the cultivation of marijuana, but not the use.

In the United States, marijuana use and cultivation is illegal at the federal level, but legal with some restrictions in Colorado and Washington State.

Hashish is not specifically illegal in Pakistan, Netherlands, Uruguay, Colorado or Washington.

A number of countries and states have decriminalized marijuana use, which means that possessing a small amount is not punishable.

Some states and countries have legalized marijuana use for medical purposes. These laws do not generally distinguish between weed and hash.

Availability

Both hash and marijuana are believed to be widely available in illegal black markets around the world.

While hash is available in America, it is less popular than marijuana. Generally, the hash form of cannabis is more popular and more widely used in Europe and Asia.

In North America, hash is also called “resin,” and some drug users cultivate it from drug paraphernalia. When the marijuana plant is smoked, it leaves behind a thick black resin on pipes. That resin can be scraped off and smoked, though it does not contain as powerful a dose of THC as pure hash.

Benefits

Many cultures believe that marijuana has spiritual and physical benefits. Modern scientific studies have shown that THC reduces nausea and pain associated with diseases like AIDS and cancer. THC may also aid in mediating symptoms of glaucoma.

For many, the main benefit of using marijuana is recreational, as it induces euphoria in users. Physically, it is not possible to use so much of either hash or weed that a person would overdose like with alcohol or cocaine; however, using too much of either product could lead to extreme paranoia, anxiety, and panic.

Both weed and hashish are used by medical marijuana patients to treat various symptoms, including pain, nausea, swelling, depression, and anxiety.

Strength

Because hashish contains such a high concentration of THC, much less of it is needed to attain the same high as with the plant form. Though hash may vary in quality due to its producer and the plant it came from, in general, users should moderate the amount they use to avoid negative psychoactive effects.

Side effects

Smoking marijuana does have negative effects on the body, causing tar to build up on lungs, which can cause certain types of cancer.

Both hashish and weed have similar negative effects on short-term memory. Though there is no evidence that use of either drug is physically addictive – no withdrawal symptoms result from stopping use – they are habitually addictive, causing users to feel a necessity to use out of habit.

What’s the difference between Hashish and Marijuana? Both hashish and marijuana — also called weed, pot or ganja — are parts of the cannabis sativa plant. The major difference between the two is that the term “weed” usually applies to dried pieces of the plant, mainly flower buds, while hash is a…

The Difference Between Weed And Cannabis

1980 or 2018? One word can make all the difference.

When I hear the word ‘weed,’ I remember rummaging through my messy college dorm room in search of a Ziplock baggie with enough flower inside for a spliff. That word reminds me of Pink Floyd posters hung with multicolored tacks, feeling excited about a new South Park episode, and three-hour cases of the giggles as I made the first friends with which smoking rituals were established.

‘Cannabis,’ on the other hand, sounds like science. It’s new to our colloquial vocabulary; I hadn’t heard of this word until I was decidedly into weed and looked at its plant genus on a Wikipedia page. ‘Cannabis’ is something more serious sounding than ‘pot’–it doesn’t like like something you chug while hanging upside down at a tailgate. It sounds like something that requires a degree of responsibility and esteem, even; ‘cannabis’ doesn’t sound like a habit one ought to outgrow upon adulthood.

A plant by any other name would taste as sweet.

Do these words mean two different things? No. They’re both terms for a cannabis plant rife with complex cannabinoids like THC, CBD and CBN. But calling it ‘pot’ or ‘weed’ versus ‘cannabis’ does bring to mind different associations, and have their own effects on the perceptions of others. I use the word ‘cannabis’ because I think it legitimizes referring to this thing by its truest identity: a plant.

Thinking about it as a plant helps strip away the socially-attributed associations of illegal contraband and deadend pastime. You aren’t considered a bad parent for eating tomatoes regularly. Enjoying the smell and effect of lavender isn’t considered an unhealthy addiction.

If one is talking about cannabis, one is given a tiny chance to demonstrate not only how they refer to this plant, but how they think about it. Merely proving that all kinds of “normal,” self-aware, functioning members of society aren’t scared to talk about or consume cannabis is the way to most effectively start changing closed minds. If we challenge people to think about it as something other than the drug their parents told them to stay away from, a different word altogether, you just might make a crack big enough for them to start questioning long-held stigmas.

Call it what it is: a plant.

The word ‘marijuana’ never really entered my vocabulary due to the clunky syllables, and considering the possibly malicious popularization of the word in order to malign Mexican immigrants, maybe it never was a proper name. The first legitimization of the word appeared in the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 , at a point in time where many believe the United States government intentionally coined a foreign-sounding name. Anti-immigration sentiment had been on the rise throughout the 1930s during the Great Depression, with so few jobs to go around in general. Some cultural critics assert that legislators selected a term like ‘marijuana’ for its associations with the Mexican language, thus feeding fear and xenophobia towards the plant and the Mexican people.

So, does it matter what we call this plant? Kind of. But as we’ve seen with other derogatory-turned-empowering terms, the meaning and power of words can transform over time, and have their own effect on the society in which the words exist.

Do these words mean two different things? No. But calling it ‘pot’ or ‘weed’ versus ‘cannabis’ does bring to mind different associations, and have their own effects on the perceptions of others.