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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Newport grower wants to help other growers solve pesticide problems

Currently, all flower and concentrates must be tested at an independent lab before they can be sold to a retailer. Growers pay hundreds of dollars per sample to have a state-certified lab search for certain pesticides or chemicals, plus calculate metrics like THC, a natural compound that causes the mental and physical “high.”

If a batch fails, the grower is expected to destroy that product, which is where New Day Cannabis wants to help.

Owner Joe Rammell has been working with Confidence Analytics, a lab in Redmond, to freeze the failed sample and strip out solvents and terpenes. The grower then can have the same strain retested, and hopefully it should come back clean.

He’s also working with the Cannabis Alliance, an statewide industry group, to encourage the Washington Liquor and Cannabis Board to modify its testing methods.

“Instead of testing individual strains, how about the whole building be tested?” he said.

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review’s Northwest Passages community forums series — which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper — by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Joe Rammell has been learning the skills needed to grow great cannabis all of his life – he just didn’t know it until a few years ago.

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Fri., April 5, 2019

New Day Cannabis

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review’s Northwest Passages community forums series — which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper — by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

‘Clean cannabis,’ free of all pesticides or contaminants, has been something many health-conscious consumers have requested and many growers have strived for. ]]>