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How to make cannabis cooking oil

Infusion is often the most challenging part of cooking with cannabis and the reason why many people turn to their vaporizer in defeat. I’m here to tell you that you can do this! Not only is it doable, but it’s worth it.

If you haven’t yet discovered the wonder that is cannabis-infused eating, I’m excited for you because you’re in for an adventure. The experience from start to finish is significantly different from common inhalation methods. The effects are typically longer, stronger, and slower to set in.

For this reason, always start with a low dose and see how an edible affects you—especially if you’re cooking your own as it is impossible to calculate their potency.

Self-isolating? Order cannabis online with Leafly Pickup or Delivery

Cannabis-infused oil is probably the most versatile medium and a great place to start, since it can be used for baking desserts, sautéing veggies, frying up your morning eggs, or putting in your salad dressing. In addition, as is the case with cooking anything at home, you have complete control over its preparation. Does peanut oil hold a special place in your heart? Make cannabis-infused peanut oil!

Recipe for cannabis cooking oil

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of ground cannabis flower (or less for milder potency)
  • 1 cup of cooking oil of your choice

Note: When making canna oil, you want to use a 1:1 ratio of cannabis to oil.

Choosing the right cooking oil base for your canna oil

Picking the right oil for infusion comes down to your flavor preferences and the dishes you plan on cooking. Oils will have different consistencies at room temperature, so be sure to put thought into how you will be storing and using your oil.

Many oils work well with baking too! So you might want to choose an oil that will have a flavor and consistency that works for multiple recipes. For example, if you are looking for an oil that can be used in a stir fry as well as a pie crust, coconut oil is a great option. It adds great flavor to veggies and remains solid enough at room temperature to hold up as a pie crust.

If you are looking for an oil with a mild flavor, vegetable and canola oil are going to be great options. They are also very versatile and work with most recipes calling for oil.

If you want something a little more robust in flavor, you can infuse olive or avocado oil. Both stand up well to the cannabis flavor and can be stored in your pantry. One of the most surprisingly delicious deserts I ever had was an olive oil ice cream. So feel free to get creative!

Materials needed:

  • Strainer or cheesecloth
  • Grinder (a simple hand grinder works best; appliances like blenders and coffee grinder pulverize the cannabis, resulting in edibles with bad tasting plant material)
  • Double-boiler, slow cooker, or saucepan, etc.

Directions:

  1. Grind the cannabis. You can include the entire plant, just the flower, a little bit of both—this is all a matter of preference. Just keep in mind that anything small enough to fit through the strainer will end up in your finished product, so again, do not grind your cannabis into a fine powder.
  2. Combine oil and cannabis in your double-boiler, slow cooker, or saucepan, and heat on low or warm for a few hours. This allows for decarboxylation (activation of THC) without scorching (which destroys the active ingredients). In all cases, a small amount of water can be added to the mixture to help avoid burning, and the temperature of the oil should never exceed 245°F. Cooking can be done a variety of ways:
    • Crock pot method: Heat oil and cannabis in a slow cooker on low for 4-6 hours, stirring occasionally.
    • Double-boiler method: Heat oil and cannabis in a double-boiler on low for at least 6 hours (8 is better), stirring occasionally.
    • Saucepan method: Heat oil and cannabis in a simple saucepan on low for at least 3 hours, stirring frequently (a saucepan is most susceptible to scorching).
  3. Strain and store the oil. Do not squeeze the cheesecloth; this will simply add more chlorophyll to your oil. All remaining plant material can be discarded or used in other dishes if desired. The oil’s shelf life is at least two months, and can be extended with refrigeration.

Note: Be cautious when using the oil to prepare dishes that require heating. Do not microwave and choose low heat whenever possible.

Tips for reducing odor when making cannabis oil

The trick for reducing odor is using the right tool for decarboxylation. The steam produced during cooking might not give off a pungent odor at first, but it gets stronger with time. It takes hours for the oil to finish, so you can imagine that the odor can build, and, if you are in the same room the whole time, you may not notice the gradual increase in dankness.

Using kitchen devices with rubber seals on their lids will allow you to lock in the majority of the odor during the cook. Finding a crock pot or pressure cooker with this feature is easy. The seal allows you to be strategic in where and when you open the lid.

Whether you take it outside or put it under your kitchen vent, not allowing the odor to fill your space is paramount when it comes to discretion. But accidents happen! If you find yourself in a situation where your space is too pungent, check out our article on how to get rid of the cannabis odor.

How to cook with your weed oil

Now that you have successfully infused your oil of choice, be sure to try a little before you make an entire meal. You want to make sure the dosage is right so the meal is delicious as well as enjoyable afterward.

You also want to be sure not to scorch the oil while cooking (just like when you are making the oil). It would be a shame for all that hard work to go to waste and to be left with a cannabis-tasting creation without any of the effects.

Now get cooking! I suggest finding a few of your favorite recipes and see if an infused-cannabis oil could work. Experimenting with different recipes is half the fun, and here are a few of our favorite recipes to get you going:

  • Martha Stewart’s “to-die-for” pot brownies: A classic done right!
  • Cannabis-infused mayo: From ranch dressing to aioli, mayo is the base to some of your favorite condiments!
  • Cannabis-infused coconut roasted citrus shrimp: Feeling fancy?
  • Cannabis-infused chocolate hazelnut spread: Find a dessert or savory snack this doesn’t make taste better, I’ll wait.
  • Canna-oil vinaigrette: Balsamic vinaigrettes are great too!

Next up: Learn how to make infused coconut oil!

This post was originally published on September 19, 2013. It was most recently updated on March 20, 2020.

Learn how to make cannabis oil to use when baking desserts, sautéing veggies, frying up your morning eggs, or in your salad dressing in 3 easy steps.

How to Use Cannabis Oil

The use of marijuana for medical purposes has opened up a market for infusing oils with Tetrahydrocannabinol, otherwise know as THC. As we all know THC is the psychoactive substance that gives users the effects they are looking for when they consume marijuana. As the health benefits of marijuana have become widely acknowledged, consumers have begun cooking with weed oils as part of their regular diets. This blog is meant to explain the process on how to make THC oils, provides tips for making infused products and most importantly shows you eight ways to use marijuana oils.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

How Do I Prepare Cannabis To Make Weed Oil?

The first step is to decarboxylate your flower. If you are unsure of how to do this, here’s an article on how to decarboxylate cannabis, and here’s another explaining what decarboxylation is.

Decarbing your cannabis before infusion is a critical step before making any sort of canna oil. You can go with an oil you prefer, as it is often comes down to personal preference regarding which oil is better to infuse with cannabis. To get the most out of your decarbed cannabis, choose an oil with good infusion rates. You can see more about the infusion efficiency of different oils here. Once you figure out which oil you want to use, whether it is coconut oil, olive oil or something more exotic it is time to begin the infusion process. That involves infusing the decarbed product with your oil of choice.

If you have the NOVA, place the oil and decarbed cannabis inside for the infusion process. Ideally, do not grind it but rather break it up into popcorn sized nugs, but it is fine to use shake or ground bud as well. Throw your cannabis right in your decarboxylator (putting it in silicon or a shot glass if you’re using kief/concentrates) and let it run its cycle while you gather your ingredients.

How To Infuse The Oil?

When you have finished decarbing you will want to do a quick infusion with your oil. For the oil to get infused with the THC it needs to get heated thoroughly and evenly. Providing too much heat or too little heat will affect the process. Uneven heating will also impact the process.

When your canna oil is done infusing, remove any plant matter by carefully straining it through cheesecloth (available in the cooking section of stores like Target or Walmart) or a coffee filter. Pour your infused oil into a container and you’re done! If you are looking to make cannabutter, be sure to place it in the fridge to harden. Canna oils, on the other hand, are fine to store on the counter. The most important thing is to keep it in an airtight container (mason jars work great) in a cool, dark space.

Now, there are differences of opinion on how long to infuse cannabis oil. Some who feel the infusion process must be at low heat for 6 hours or more while others believe that the time can be cut short. Take the guessing out of accurately measuring your dosages and how long it takes to infuse THC oil with the NOVA Decarboxylator. The overall objective is to retain as much THC from the material as possible, and we have the testing results to show the effectiveness of the Ardent infusion process

How To Accurately Measure Dosage

The ideal ratio for making weed oil is to calculate the amount of cannabis it will take to get the THC dosage that you want, and then mix with the desired amount of oil. It is important to understand the dosage that you want for your oils before you start infusing the marijuana.

Typically decarbed cannabis flower has between 5-20% THC content, which means about 50-200mg of THC in every gram of decarbed flower. It may be more or less depending on how the plant was grown. You can use more or less decarbed cannabis in your infusion to dial the dose up or down. After infusion, you can separate the material from the infused oil. For even cleaner oil, use a fine screen to remove the decarbed marijuana from the oil after infusion.

Many consumers enjoy making THC oil with coconut oil due to its ability to mask the taste of cannabis. As there are a growing number of edible users who don’t like the taste of marijuana.

How To Use THC Oil

Once the infusion process is complete and you have poured the filtered cannaoil into a container, the next commonly asked question is “how to use thc oil?” There’s really no end to what you can do with THC oil. Again, based on yours interests, a dessert, toast or any dish which uses butter or oil can be made. How much can go into each of these dishes will be based on the recipe of the dish.

If you are not sure on how to measure the dosages of cannabis, you can read our guide on accurately dosing cannabis by taking THC measurements. In a medical situation it’s advised to consult your doctor on how much marijuana you should consume for each dosage. Many consumers use a dropper with the oil decanter to measure the amount of oil used each time. Whether you are making brownies or chocolates at home you can measure the dosages based on the amount of decarbed cannabis used to make the cannabutter or canna oil.

How To Use Cannabis Oil (8 Best Ways)

All of these activities are home-based. This means you can handle the preparation of weed oil or cannabutter and the subsequent dishes on your spare time. As long as you have all the ingredients and the equipment to get it done correctly, the process is simple and can quickly save you a lot of money quickly. The Ardent NOVA Decarboxyolator is the perfect tool if you are looking for the best way to decarb cannabis to make THC oil without wasting time or material.

If you wish to add flower to your food intake, there are multiple options to do it depending on your taste and personal preferences. There are plenty of canna oil recipes that you can use. Don’t forget there are also benefits of using decarbed cannabis without going through the infusion process. There are even recipes for making cannabis ice cream. Since there are a lot of ways to use canna oil and cannabutter, we put together a list of uses, along with the best oils for each one. You can also see this next link for more information on the best oil to infuse THC.

1. Baking

Using cannabutter or alternatives such as cannabis canola (here’s how to make edibles without butter) oil in baked goods are classic ways to make edibles, but a lot of people have started using cannabis coconut oil in their favorite sweet treats since it’s vegan and paleo-friendly. You can also use infused olive oil in your baked goods although it’s important to know that most olive oils have a strong flavor that may change the flavor of your finished goodie.

2. Cooking

Cooking with weed oils like olive, peanut, or canola are great ways to inject THC into your meal. Cook with it as you would normally, just be mindful of how much you’re using since the effects of ingesting cannabis are slower to set in and last much longer than smoking. Ideas: saute veggies, roast potatoes, marinate meat, or mix up a vinaigrette for your favorite salad.

3. Capsules

If you’re already using cannacaps or want to start, infused coconut oil is a great addition to your capsules. Because coconut oil has a high saturated fat content, it helps your body best absorb the cannabinoids, delivering a stronger effect per dose of medicine (THC and CBD) than other oils. In addition, coconut oil has a long shelf life, meaning that cannacaps made with this oil will last an extremely long time (especially if stored in the fridge or freezer!)

4. Pain Salve

Cannabis-infused salves and topicals deliver quick pain relief and a feeling of relaxation to your muscles, without any psychoactive effects. Coconut oil infusions are a good choice for creating your own pain salves because coconut oil is a great transporter of CBD from your skin into your body’s cannabinoid receptors. Better CBD absorption means more relief for sore muscles, arthritis, and other localized pains. It also becomes as easy as adding your infused coconut oil into a non-cannabis product you already own and love!

5. Skincare

In addition to pain salves and balms, cannabis coconut oil is a great addition to almost any skincare routine. Mixed with aloe vera and vitamin E, it makes a great lotion for everyday use or for healing sunburns. Some skincare gurus swear by cannabis coconut oil as a facial moisturizer, claiming that with regular use, you’ll get a glowy complexion and see the anti-aging effects of cannabis.

6. Smoothies

Cannaoil in your smoothie? Yes! Due to its reputation as a superfood and the creamy texture that results from blending coconut oil, it has become a popular addition to smoothies. There are a lot of cannabis recipes out there but you can experiment by adding a tablespoon of cannabis coconut oil or less if your infusion is strong (5-10 mg is a good starting point) to your favorite smoothie recipe.

7. Tea

Adding cannabutter or cannaoil to your tea may sound strange, but it actually results in a creamy, latte-like drink. As far as oil goes, coconut oil is the best choice due to the flavor and the fact that unlike other oils, it gets creamy when mixed up. Just brew a cup of your favorite tea and stir in the cannabutter or cannabis coconut oil until it’s mixed well. The result is a warm, comforting, medicinal cuppa, sure to make you feel good.

8. Coffee

“Bulletproof coffee”, coffee with unsalted butter or coconut oil in place of cream or milk, has exploded in popularity over the past few years. It’s a staple in paleo and keto diets and many vegans enjoy the coconut oil version. Of course, mixing in cannabutter or cannabis coconut oil is a great way to get the perceived benefits of bulletproof coffee along with a healthy dose of THC. Stir into your favorite brew, or put it in the blender for a frothy morning drink.

Additional Canna Oil Recipes

If you are wondering what type of dishes to prepare with your canna oil, we recommend several different ways of eating decarbed weed in our recipes. Whether you are looking to make baked goods, alcoholic drinks using weed oil, or infused recipes for food, the possibilities are endless. Some of our most popular canna recipes include:

Keep in mind the proper dosages for your recipe of choice. We must also note that the consumption of marijuana for is age-restricted. If there are children at home, take all proper precautions to ensure they don’t ingest weed oil or cannabis butter or accidentally add it to their food.

Perfect Decarb Tool

If you are looking for the best way to decarb marijuana, we recommend you purchase the Ardent NOVA Decarboxylator to get the perfect decarb each time. Whether you are looking to make canna oil or cannabutter. Our goal is to provide some inspiration for your cannabis cooking adventures. Whether you’re a recreational or medicinal user, there are lots of ways for you to use cannabutter or canna oil in the kitchen. Share your favorite recipe in the comments!

There are also direct uses of THC oil. Some people decide to put a few drops of the oil below their tongue for it to have an almost immediate sublingual effect. As mentioned earlier, using coconut and sweeter oils in the preparation of your canna oil will help remove the odor and give it a better smell. Lastly, savory canna oils pair better with more savory dishes, just as you would expect.

How to use cannabis oil to best effect it's not all about baking canna oil recipes! 8 tips on using THC oil to put your weed to good use! ]]>