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General Hemp Information

General Hemp Information, Uses, Facts

On an annual basis, 1 acre of hemp will produce as much fiber as 2 to 3 acres of cotton. Hemp fiber is stronger and softer than cotton, lasts twice as long as cotton, and will not mildew.

Cotton grows only in moderate climates and requires more water than hemp; but hemp is frost tolerant, requires only moderate amounts of water, and grows in all 50 states. Cotton requires large quantities of pesticides and herbicides–50% of the world’s pesticides/herbicides are used in the production of cotton. Hemp requires no pesticides, no herbicides, and only moderate amounts of fertilizer.

On an annual basis, 1 acre of hemp will produce as much paper as 2 to 4 acres of trees. From tissue paper to cardboard, all types of paper products can be produced from hemp.

The quality of hemp paper is superior to tree-based paper. Hemp paper will last hundreds of years without degrading, can be recycled many more times than tree-based paper, and requires less toxic chemicals in the manufacturing process than does paper made from trees.

Hemp can be used to produce fiberboard that is stronger and lighter than wood. Substituting hemp fiberboard for timber would further reduce the need to cut down our forests.

Hemp can be used to produce strong, durable and environmentally-friendly plastic substitutes. Thousands of products made from petroleum-based plastics can be produced from hemp-based composites.

It takes years for trees to grow until they can be harvested for paper or wood, but hemp is ready for harvesting only 120 days after it is planted. Hemp can grow on most land suitable for farming, while forests and tree farms require large tracts of land available in few locations. Harvesting hemp rather than trees would also eliminate erosion due to logging, thereby reducing topsoil loss and water pollution caused by soil runoff.

Hemp seeds contain a protein that is more nutritious and more economical to produce than soybean protein. Hemp seeds are not intoxicating. Hemp seed protein can be used to produce virtually any product made from soybean: tofu, veggie burgers, butter, cheese, salad oils, ice cream, milk, etc. Hemp seed can also be ground into a nutritious flour that can be used to produce baked goods such as pasta, cookies, and breads.

Hemp seed oil can be used to produce non-toxic diesel fuel, paint, varnish, detergent, ink and lubricating oil. Because hemp seeds account for up to half the weight of a mature hemp plant, hemp seed is a viable source for these products.

Just as corn can be converted into clean-burning ethanol fuel, so can hemp. Because hemp produces more biomass than any plant species (including corn) that can be grown in a wide range of climates and locations, hemp has great potential to become a major source of ethanol fuel.

Literally millions of wild hemp plants currently grow throughout the U.S. Wild hemp, like hemp grown for industrial use, has no drug properties because of its low THC content. U.S. marijuana laws prevent farmers from growing the same hemp plant that proliferates in nature by the millions.

From 1776 to 1937, hemp was a major American crop and textiles made from hemp were common. Yet, The American Textile Museum, The Smithsonian Institute, and most American history books contain no mention of hemp. The government’s War on Drugs has created an atmosphere of self censorship where speaking of hemp in a positive manner is considered politically incorrect or taboo.

United States Presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp, used products made from hemp, and praised the hemp plant in some of their writings.

No other natural resource offers the potential of hemp. Cannabis Hemp is capable of producing significant quantities of paper, textiles, building materials, food, medicine, paint, detergent, varnish, oil, ink, and fuel. Unlike other crops, hemp can grow in most climates and on most farmland throughout the world with moderate water and fertilizer requirements, no pesticides, and no herbicides. Cannabis Hemp (also known as Indian Hemp) has enormous potential to become a major natural resource that can benefit both the economy and the environment.

Housing

70% of the Cannabis Plant total weight is made up of the ‘hurd’ or woody inner core. This part of the plant is THC free (i.e. Hemp) and is used in housing construction. The silica leached from the soil by the plant combined with unslaked lime forms a chemical bond similar to cement which is fire and water proof. Cannabis Homes

Hemp may be grown also for food (the seed) but in the UK at least (and probably in other EU countries) cultivation licenses are not available for this purpose. Within Defra (the UK’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) hemp is treated as purely a non-food crop, despite the fact that seed can and does appear on the UK market as a perfectly legal food product.

Nutrition

Both the complete protein and the oils contained in hempseeds (rich in lanolin and linolenic acids) are in ideal ratios for human nutrition.

Fiber

Until its rediscovery in the late 1980s, the use of hemp for fiber production had declined sharply over the past decades, but hemp still occupied an important place amongst natural fibers as it is strong, durable and unaffected by water. The main uses of hemp fiber were inrope, sacking, carpet, nets and webbing. A hemp clothing industry was reborn in the West in 1988, and hemp is being used in increasing quantities in paper manufacturing. The cellulose content is about 70%.

Harvesting the fiber

Smallholder plots are usually harvested by hand. The plants are cut at 2 to 3 cm above the soil and left on the ground to dry. Mechanical harvesting is now common, using specially adapted cutter-binders or simpler cutters.

The cut hemp is laid in swathes to dry for up to four days. This was traditionally followed by retting , either water retting whereby the bundled hemp floats in water or dew retting whereby the hemp remains on the ground and is affected by the moisture in dew moisture, and by moulds and bacterial action. Modern processes use steam and machinery to separate the fiber, a process known as thermo-mechanical pulping.

Fuel can be a by-product of hemp cultivation. One fuel would be biodiesel because of the oils in the seeds and stalk of the hemp, another would be biofuel from the fibrous stalks.

Cultivation

Millennia of selective breeding have resulted in varieties that look quite different. Also, breeding since circa 1930 has focused quite specifically on producing strains which would perform very poorly as sources of drug material. Hemp grown for fiber is planted closely, resulting in tall, slender plants with long fibers. Ideally, according to Defra in 2004 the herb should be harvested before it flowers. This early cropping is because fiber quality declines if flowering is allowed and, incidentally, this cropping also pre-empts the herb’s maturity as a potential source of drug material, even though the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content would still be very low with these strains of hemp.

The name Cannabis is the genus and was the name favored by the 19th century medical practitioners who helped to introduce the herb’s drug potential to modern English-speaking consciousness. Cannabis for non-drug purposes (especially ropes and textiles) was then already well known as hemp.

The name marijuana is Mexican (or Latin American) in origin and associated almost exclusively with the herb’s drug potential. That marijuana is now well known in English as a name for drug material is due largely to the efforts of US drug prohibitionists during the 1920s and 1930s. We can surmise that this name was highlighted because it helped to characterize the herbal drug as quite alien to English-speaking culture.

Varieties

There are broadly three groups of Cannabis varieties being cultivated today:

  • Varieties primarily cultivated for their fiber, characterized by long stems and little branching, called industrial hemp
  • Varieties grown for seed from which hemp oil is extracted
  • Varieties grown for medicinal or recreational purposes.

A nominal if not legal distinction is often made between hemp, with concentrations of the psychoactive chemical THC far too low to be useful as a drug, and Cannabis used for medical, recreational, or spiritual purposes.

Historical cultivation

From the 1881 Household Cyclopedia :

The soils most suited to the culture of this plant are those of the deep, black, putrid vegetable kind, that are low, and rather inclined to moisture, and those of the deep mellow, loamy, or sandy descriptions. The quantity of produce is generally much greater on the former than on the latter; but it is said to be greatly inferior in quality. It may, however, be grown with success on lands of a less rich and fertile kind by proper care and attention in their culture and preparation.

In order to render the grounds proper for the reception of the crop, they should be reduced into a fine mellow state of mould, and be perfectly cleared from weeds, by repeated plowings. When it succeeds grain crops, the work is mostly accomplished by three plowings, and as many harrowings: the first being given immediately after the preceding crop is removed, the second early in the spring, and the last, or seed earth, just before the seed is to be put in. In the last plowing, well rotted manure, in the proportion of fifteen or twenty, or good compost, in the quantity of twenty-five or thirty-three horse-cart loads, should be turned into the land; as without this it is seldom that good crops can be produced. The surface of the ground being left perfectly flat, and as free from furrows as possible; as by these means the moisture is more effectually retained, and the growth of the plants more fully promoted.

It is of much importance in the cultivation of hemp crops that the seed is new, and of a good quality, which may in some measure be known by its feeling heavy in the hand, and being of a bright shining color.

The proportion of seed that is most commonly employed is from two to three bushels, according to the quality of the land; but, as the crops are greatly injured by the plants standing too closely together, two bushels, or two bushels and a half may be a more advantageous quantity.

As the hemp plant is extremely tender in its early growth, care should be taken not to put the seed into the ground at so early a period, as that it may be liable to be injured by the effects of frost; nor to protract the sowing to so late a season as that the quality of the produce may be effected. The best season, on the drier sorts of land in the southern districts, is as soon as possible after the frosts are over in April; and, on the same descriptions of soil, in the more northern ones, towards the close of the same month or early in the ensuing one.

The most general method of putting crops of this sort into the soil is the broadcast, the seed being dispersed over the surface of the land in as even a manner as possible, and afterwards covered in by means of a very light harrowing. In many cases, however, especially when the crops are to stand for seed, the drill method in rows, at small distances, might be had recourse to with advantage; as, in this way, the early growth of the plants would be more effectually promoted, and the land be kept in a more clean and perfect state of mould, which are circumstances of importance in such crops. In whatever method the seed is put in, care must constantly be taken to keep the birds from it for some time afterwards.

This sort of crop is frequently cultivated on the same piece of ground for a great number of years, without any other kind intervening; but, in such cases, manure must be applied with almost every crop, in pretty large proportions, to prevent the exhaustion that must otherwise take place. It may be sown after most sorts of grain crops, especially where the land possesses sufficient fertility, and is in a proper state of tillage.

Thick stands of fiber hemp compete well with weeds.

As hemp, from its tall growth and thick foliage, soon covers the surface of the land, and prevents the rising of weeds, little attention is necessary after the seed has been put into the ground, especially where the broadcast method of sowing is practiced; but, when put in by the drill machine, a hoeing or two may be had recourse to with advantage in the early growth of the crop.

In the culture of this plant, it is particularly necessary that the same piece of land grows both male and female, or what is sometimes denominated simple hemp. The latter kind contains the seed.

When the grain is ripe (which is known by its becoming of a whitish-yellow color, and a few of the leaves beginning to drop from the stems); this happens commonly about thirteen or fourteen weeks from the period of its being sown, according as the season may be dry or wet (the first sort being mostly ripe some weeks before the latter), the next operation is that of taking it from the ground; which is effected by pulling it up by the roots, in small parcels at a time, by the hand, taking care to shake off the mould well from them before the handfuls are laid down. In some districts, the whole crop is pulled together, without any distinction being made between the different kinds of hemp; while, in others, it is the practice to separate and pull them at different times, according to their ripeness. The latter is obviously the better practice; as by pulling a large proportion of the crop before it is in a proper state of maturity, the quantity of produce must not only be considerably lessened, but its quality greatly injured by being rendered less durable.

After being thus pulled, it is tied up in small parcels, or what are sometimes termed baits.

Where crops of this kind are intended for seeding, they should be suffered to stand till the seed becomes in a perfect state of maturity, which is easily known by the appearance of it on inspection. The stems are then pulled and bound up, as in the other case, the bundles being set up in the same manner as grain, until the seed becomes so dry and firm as to shed freely. It is then either immediately threshed out upon large cloths for the purpose in the field, or taken home to have the operation afterwards performed.

The hemp, as soon as pulled, is tied up in small bundles, frequently at both ends.

It is then conveyed to pits, or ponds of stagnant water, about six or eight feet in depth, such as have a clayey soil being in general preferred, and deposited in beds, according to their size, and depth, the small bundles being laid both in a straight direction and crosswise of each other, so as to bind perfectly together; the whole, being loaded with timber, or other materials, so as to keep the beds of hemp just below the surface of the water.

It is not usual to water more than four or five times in the same pit, till it has been filled with water. Where the ponds are not sufficiently large to contain the whole of the produce at once, it is the practice to pull the hemp only as it can be admitted into them, it being thought disadvantageous to leave the hemp upon the ground after being pulled. It is left in these pits four, five, or six days, or even more, according to the warmth of the season and the judgment of the operator, on his examining whether the hemp material readily separates from the reed or stem; and then taken up and conveyed to a pasture field which is clean and even, the bundles being loosened and spread out thinly, stem by stem, turning it every second or third day, especially in damp weather, to prevent its being injured by worms or other insects. It should remain in this situation for two, three, four, or more weeks, according to circumstances, and be then collected together when in a perfectly dry state, tied up into large bundles, and placed in some secure building until an opportunity is afforded for breaking it, in order to separate the hemp. By this means the process of grassing is not only shortened, but the more expensive ones of breaking, scutching, and bleaching the yarn, rendered less violent and troublesome.

After the hemp has been removed from the field it is in a state to be broken and swingled, operations that are mostly performed by common laborers, by means of machinery for the purpose, the produce being tied up in stones. The refuse collected in the latter process is denominated sheaves, and is in some districts employed for the purposes of fuel. After having undergone these different operations, it is ready for the purposes of the manufacturer.

History

Hemp use dates back to the Stone Age, with hemp fiber imprints found in pottery shards in China over 10,000 years old.

Major hemp producing countries

From the 1950s to the 1980s the Soviet Union was the world’s largest producer (3,000 kmІ in 1970). The main production areas were in Ukraine, the Kursk and Orel regions of Russia, and near the Polish border.

Other important producing countries were China, Hungary, the former Yugoslavia, Romania, Poland, France and Italy.

Canada, United Kingdom, and Germany all resumed commercial production in the 1990s. British production is mostly used as bedding for horses; other uses are under development. The largest outlet for German fiber is composite automotive panels. Companies in Canada, UK, USA and Germany among many others are processing hemp seed into a growing range of food products and cosmetics; many traditional growing countries still continue with textile grade fiber production.

Future of hemp

In the last decade hemp has been widely promoted as a crop for the future. This is stimulated by new technologies which make hemp suitable for industrial paper manufacturing, use as a renewable energy source (biofuel), and the use of hemp derivatives as replacement for petrochemical products.

The increased demand for health food has stimulated the trade in shelled hemp seed. Hemp oil is increasingly being used in the manufacturing of bodycare products.

Jesse Ventura was a vocal proponent of hemp cultivation while governor of Minnesota, though agricultural policymakers within his administration felt that hemp cultivation could not compete economically with crops such as corn and soybeans.

THC in hemp

Hemp contains delta-9- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the psychoactive ingredient found in hashish. THC is present in all hemp varieties to some extent. In varieties grown for use as a drug, where males are removed in order to prevent fertilization, THC levels can reach as high as 20-30% in the unfertilized females which are given ample room to flower.

In hemp varieties grown for seed or fiber use, the plants are grown very closely together and a very dense biomass product is obtained, rich in oil from the seeds and fiber from the stalks and low in THC content. EU regulations limit THC content to 0.3% in industrial hemp. In Canada, the THC limit is 1%.

On October 9, 2001, the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) ruled that even traces of THC in products intended for food use would be illegal as of February 6, 2002. This Interpretive Rule would have ruled out the production or use of hempseed or hempseed oil in food use in the USA, but after the Hemp Industries Association (HIA) filed suit the rule was stayed by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on March 7, 2002. On March 21, 2003, the DEA issued a nearly identical Final Rule which was also stayed by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on April 16, 2003. On February 6, 2004 the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued a unanimous decision in favor of the HIA in which Judge Betty Fletcher wrote, “[T]hey (DEA) cannot regulate naturally-occurring THC not contained within or derived from marijuana-i.e. non-psychoactive hemp is not included in Schedule I. The DEA has no authority to regulate drugs that are not scheduled, and it has not followed procedures required to schedule a substance. The DEA’s definition of “THC” contravenes the unambiguously expressed intent of Congress in the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) and cannot be upheld”. On September 28, 2004 the HIA claimed victory after DEA declined to appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States the ruling from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals protecting the sale of hemp-containing foods. Industrial hemp remains legal for import and sale in the U.S., but U.S. farmers still are not permitted to grow it.

The DEA’s strong opposition to a chemical widely thought to be less addictive or harmful than legal nicotine or alcohol leads some of its critics to charge ulterior motives such as protection of the synthetic-fiber, wood pulp, petrochemical, and pharmochemical industries. The position has been an occasional embarrassment to the US government, as when they ignored their own arguments and grew it large-scale in Kentucky and Wisconsin for World War II. Critics of the HIA, however, argue that the necessities of the war and the unavailability of adequate synthetic substitutes outweighed the social, health, and public safety risks of producing hemp. Today, they assert, those risks are substantial, according to many experts, because hemp resembles crude marihuana and there is no visual way to distinguish the two. This, alone, would make enforcement of the marihuana laws by federal and state authorities all but impossible if hemp were legalized. The critics of HIA often allege that it is the HIA that may have an ulterior motive in promoting hemp for economic reasons while really seeking to legalize marihuana for recreational use. They add that if the federal government were to authorize the production of industrial hemp, it would likely require registration of farmers, inspections and audits of farms, and a “strict liability” clause in the law to allow administrative seizure of all land parcels upon which any crude marihuana is grown or where hemp with a THC level above one percent is found. This would discourage farmers from trying to use hemp to circumvent the law’s prohibition of marihuana while still protecting the public’s right to produce industrial hemp — a compromise that would satisfy all but those with the aforementioned hidden agenda.

The presence of (some) THC in hemp varieties and the fear that THC could be extracted from industrial hemp for illegal purposes has hampered the development of hemp in many countries. Since the early 1990s, however, many countries, including Canada, Australia, the UK, The Netherlands and Germany, allow hemp plantings and commercial scale production. Plant breeders are working on the development of new varieties which are low in THC.

You might also find this Italian study informative and interesting, as well: Antibacterial Cannabinoids from Cannibus sativa. Don’t forget to see this page, either. It’s full of relevent Hemp information.

Hemp information uses and facts including: industrial hemp cultivation history, hemp anti-bacterial properties , Cannabinoids and CBD from Cannibus sativa, and general hemp knowledge

Hemp facts

Did you know that hemp can eliminate toxins and radioactive material? It’s true! Scientists planted hemp at Chernobyl and discovered that hemp conducted Phytoremediation, which means it cleans up the air and soil around it as it is growing, decomposing chemicals from the soil and healing the earth. Hemp rejuvenated thousands of acres of wasteland in Eastern Europe following the nuclear fallout of Chernobyl, making it cultivable for agriculture once more.

2. Hemp helped to defeat Hitler

Hemp was banned by the US government in 1937 under the Marihuana Act as a way to alienate the plant by making its familiarity to its psychoactive cousin plant Marijuana a seemingly bad thing. However during WWII the United States Department of Agriculture lifted this law, encouraging farmers to grow Hemp to help with the war effort. This was due to a shortage in key imported Hemp goods from places like Indonesia which were essential to providing supplies for troops, such as rope, tents, kit bags and sails. The government realised the efficiency with which hemp could be cultivated to produce these goods for the allied side. The US government actually produced an eleven minute promotional video which was shown in cinema theatres across the country, prompting and encouraging farmers to engage their efforts in helping grow hemp to help the war effort.

Check out our range of Hemp rope here and Hemp fabrics here

You can watch the “Hemp for Victory” video campaign below.

3. Hemp is ideal for outdoor clothing!

Hemp has anti-fungal and anti-microbial properties and hemp doesn’t retain odour-causing bacteria like synthetic or cotton fibres does; its hollow shafts make it super absorbent and an excellent choice for outdoor activities.

Check out our range of women’s and men’s outdoor clothing here

4. Hemp and breast milk share an essential nutrient

Hemp seeds are one of the most nutritionally beneficial foods there are. They are rich in essential fatty acids including gamma linolenic acid (GLA) which is actually a substance found in breast milk! As well as being an excellent source of nutrition for newborns and babies, GLA is great for people with arthritis, muscle inflammation and skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. Hemp seeds are also a natural source of vitamins like calcium, potassium, magnesium, fibre and iron! Great for a balanced diet and also for meat/diary substitutes.

You can read about all the different ways of getting hemp into your diet here or check out our list of delicious homemade recipes here

5. Hemp can produce 4 times as much paper as trees can

Hemp plants are rich in cellulose which is why hemp plastics make a fantastic alternative to carbon positive single use synthetic materials. And the same can be said for paper too! Trees are made up of 30% cellulose (of which toxic chemicals are required to extract the substance needed to produce paper) vs Hemp which has up to 85% natural cellulose! This cellulose is transformed into pulp, with hemp pulp naturally being a much higher quality than wood and as such, produces stronger and better quality paper. And Hemp is much quicker than trees to produce the same amount of fibres needed for paper – it takes 20 – 80 years to grow trees ready for producing paper vs 4 months for hemp! And because hemp regenerates the soil it grows in, as soon as it’s harvested it’s ready to grow again, vs trees which will take years for the soil to replenish all the vitamins it needs to grow a new harvest successfully. Also for producing paper, one acre of hemp can produce as much paper as 4 – 10 acres of trees over a 20 year period.

Check out our Hemp paper here

6. Hemp was originally used to make canvas

Although most canvas nowadays is made from a cotton/linen and synthetic fabric blend, it was initially made using Hemp! It was used in the creation of sails, marquees, tents backpacks and even the first artists canvas were made using hemp! It was used for innumerable purposes for hundreds of years due to its versatility and ease to cultivate, until its decline in the mid 30s- 40s.

Wanna know something really cool? The word “canvas” is derived from the word “cannabis”. It is an old English word taken from an even older Northern French Canevas based on the Latin word Cannabis which originated in ancient Greece!

7. We could’ve all been driving Hemp cars by now

Whaaat? Yes, really! It all started in 1941, when Henry Ford owned a car made of soybean hemp and plastics. It was lighter than steel, but it was durable, withstanding ten times the impacts that a metal car would and without a single dent! However due to its undesirable relationship to Marijuana, as well as oither variables we’ll look at in the future, this exciting venture was repressed.

Nowadays however Hemp plastic has begun to be integrated into the automobile industry again. In 2008 Lotus launched their eco friendly sports car, featuring lush hemp fabric on the steering wheel and hard compressed hemp making up the seats. And because hemp plastics are 100% biodegradable, this is great news for the car industry!

So we know a car can be made of hemp, but can it run on it too? Absolutely! Hemp seed oil can be converted into a biodegradable and toxic-free biodiesel, an incredible eco-friendly equivalent to fossil fuel guzzling counterparts.

8. Hemp founded the United States of America

Okay, maybe it helped. The first and second draft of the US constitution was drafted on Dutch hemp paper way back in 1776 and up until prohibition in the 1920s, was a key material in paper, construction and the early plastics industry. George Washington, first president of the US, was a hemp farmer as was Thomas Jefferson, another Founding Father. Jefferson said “Hemp is of the first necessity to the wealth and protection of the country.” This statement was the catalyst for colonial farmers to be required to sow and harvest hemp during the late 1700s and beyond. It was a key crop grown in pre-Civil War slave plantations and continued to be imperative in agricultural industries grown nationally until its prohibition.

Read more facts about what makes Hemp such a happy plant here

9. Hemp enriches the soil as it grows

Hemp is equipped with deep roots that allows it to grow in a wide variey of soil and terrains. Not only is it versatile but Hemp replenishes its own nitrogen stores, which is vital for plants to photosynthesise, back into the soil as it grows.

Hemp also has a really high carbon-dioxide uptake – it starts a process named carbon sequestration that traps emissions meaning it neutralizes its carbon levels as it grows.

When the hemp plant is reaped, the stem and leaves contain so many nutrients that many farmers take what they don’t need and put it back in the soil. This process rejuvenates the soil even more, enriching the soil with nitrogen, aiding with an even larger yield for the next season.

10. Hemp helps your body and your brain

Hemp seeds have more digestible fibre than kale, more digestible protein than soy and more digestible omegas then flax. It is high in calcium iron, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamin a and enzymes. It is low in saturated fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates. It’s good for the brain, the immune system, weight loss, skin and inflammation.

Hemp is a protein that holds amino acids and important vitamins. Hemp seeds are a nutritionally dense food, which could be made into many different foods, as with soya and most significantly into oil or flour. Don’t forget that hemp is a hearty plant that can be grown in different types of soil and land.

Check out our full range of hemp foods & drinks here

11. The future of sustainable construction could be Hemp!

Today, hemp is a popular choice for building homes because structures made from hemp are pest-free, rot-free, mould-free, and are fire-resistant. Not only is the legendary Kevin McCloud a big fan of Hemp in building structures saying ‘Hemp homes are the warmest, driest, cheapest & most eco-sustainable form of home construction’ but it really is better for the environment than ordinary concrete. We know Hemp is better for the environment than pretty much all other agricultural plants as it is carbon neutral/negative, but it’s also naturally insulating, lightweight and durable – making it the perfect material for building homes efficiently and safely whilst providing all the qualities desired in safe, eco-friendly housing.

Hemp facts Did you know that hemp can eliminate toxins and radioactive material? It’s true! Scientists planted hemp at Chernobyl and discovered that hemp conducted Phytoremediation, which means ]]>