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Cannabis, alcohol and cigarette use during the acute post-concussion period

Affiliations

  • 1 Hull Ellis Concussion and Research Clinic, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • 2 Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • PMID: 31621424
  • DOI: 10.1080/02699052.2019.1679885

Cannabis, alcohol and cigarette use during the acute post-concussion period

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Authors

Affiliations

  • 1 Hull Ellis Concussion and Research Clinic, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • 2 Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • PMID: 31621424
  • DOI: 10.1080/02699052.2019.1679885

Abstract

Objective: To document the prevalence of acute post-concussion cannabis, alcohol and cigarette use and their association with clinical recovery and symptom burden.Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted. Concussions were physician-diagnosed and presented to the emergency department and concussion clinic within 7 days post-injury. Participants were assessed weekly and followed for a minimum 4 weeks. A survival analysis (using physician-determined recovery to both cognitive and physical activities) in addition to a weekly symptom score analysis was conducted.Results: A total of 307 acute concussions with a mean age of 33.7 years (SD, 13.0) were included. Acute post-concussion cannabis, alcohol and cigarette use were identified in 43 (14.0%), 125 (40.7%) and 61 (19.9%) individuals. Acute cannabis, alcohol and cigarette use were not associated with recovery to cognitive (p > .05) or physical activity (p > .05). Acute cigarette use was associated with a higher unadjusted symptom severity score at week1 (p = .003). Acute cannabis use was associated with lower symptom severity scores at week-3 (p = .061) and week-4 (p = .029).Conclusion: In conclusion, cannabis, alcohol and cigarette use were prevalent in the acute period post-concussion; however, were not observed to impact recovery within the first 4 weeks post-injury. Amongst unrecovered individuals, acute cannabis use was associated with lower symptom burden, while cigarette use was associated with greater initial symptom burden.

Keywords: CBD; Concussion; TBI; alcohol; cannabidiol; cannabinoids; cannabis; marijuana; tobacco; traumatic brain injury.

<span><b>Objective</b>: To document the prevalence of acute post-concussion cannabis, alcohol and cigarette use and their association with clinical recovery and symptom burden.<b>Methods</b>: A prospective cohort study was conducted. Concussions were physician-diagnosed and presented to the emergency depa</span> …